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as on July 17, 2024

raj Gupta

Pune, Maharashtra 411033

Experts In:All About Doors: Guide to Choosing the Perfect Door for Your Home  

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Introduction

 

When it comes to your home, every detail matters. Choosing the right door for your home not only enhances the aesthetics of your property but also serves essential functional purposes. But with so many options available, how do you choose the perfect door for your home?

 

This comprehensive article will explore the factors to consider when selecting the perfect door for your home, from assessing your architectural needs to understanding materials, styles, sizes, hardware, and more. Read on as we embark on this journey to help you make an informed decision with Foot2Feet today!

 

Understanding Your Needs

 

Assessing Your Home's Architecture and Style

 

Assessing your home's unique needs before diving into the world of door options is essential. Considering your home’s architecture and style will be a great starting point and influence the overall aesthetic of the door you choose.

 

For example, if you have a modern and sleek-looking style home with minimalism at its core, a pivot door with contemporary designs and clean lines might be suitable. Having said that, you don’t necessarily have to stick to the same style. Instead, you can create a blend of your own unique style that goes well with your home’s architecture.

 

Determining your Functional Requirements

 

Determining your functional requirements like security considerations, energy efficiency, and noise reduction is equally important as compared to understanding your home’s architectural needs. Understanding your functional requirements can help you tailor your door choice on a wholesome level.

 

The following are some of the functional requirements to watch out for when it comes to choosing the right door for your home.

 

a) Security and Privacy Considerations:

 

Security and Privacy play an important role in choosing the right door. Is your house in an area more susceptible to rains and hailstorms? Maybe glass doors, no matter how strong, might not be a great choice.

 

Do you house someone who is a significant public figure? A steel or bulletproof door might probably be a great choice. Keeping these types of doors aside, one thing always remains constant for security and privacy - the door's locking mechanism. Make sure the door you choose has a robust locking mechanism.

 

b) Energy Efficiency and Insulation

 

An energy-efficient door can help reduce heat loss or gain, resulting in lower energy bills. Look for doors with proper insulation and weatherstripping like steel and fiberglass doors.

 

Since this also depends on the air gap between the doors, consider fiberglass doors with a thermal break. Further, the construction of the door should be such that the threshold lock is smooth and the weatherstripping seal is properly made.

 

c) Noise reduction

 

If you live in a busy neighborhood or near a main road, noise reduction might become a priority. Opt for doors equipped with soundproofing features like the STC door. Generally, STC doors come with more mass than standard solid doors and are usually used in classrooms, courtrooms, and even military facilities.

 

Your sound-proofing requirements depend on how busy your own home is, the neighborhood, and the type of area you live in. Is your home at the forefront of a main street? Or is it part of the quiet countryside? All these factors will contribute to how much noise reduction do your doors need to carry.

 

Door Materials and Construction

 

When it comes to door materials, various options are available, each with its own set of characteristics. Let's take a closer look at the most popular choices.

 

Wood

 

Different types of Wood and their characteristics

 

Wooden doors come in a variety of species, each with distinct properties. They come in the shape of Solid Wood, Hollow Core, and Solid Core. In the type of woods available for doors, the typical choices are oak, mahogany, cherry, maple, and pine.

 

Here is a brief overview of some of these types:

 

i) Mahogany: Mahogany has a rich, attractive appearance, whilst oak is renowned for its durability and strength.

 

ii) Cherry: Cherry ages gracefully, changing from its distinctive ruby tint to a deeper shade.
 

iii) Pine: Pine is less expensive but softer and may need more upkeep than maple, which is lighter and has a smooth surface.

 

Pros and cons of Wood doors

 

Wood is one of the popular and classic choices for doors. However, it is best to know if it is really suitable for your needs. Let us explore a few pros and cons for wood to evaluate this.

 

Pros

 

The following are some of the pros of wood doors:

 

●  Aesthetic appeal: Wooden doors have a natural warmth and elegance that add to the aesthetic appeal of your home.

 

●  Customizability: Wood is easily cut and altered to meet many designs and styles.

 

●  Psychological Effects: Wooden doors are known to reduce fatigue, and stress and create a soothing atmosphere.

 

Cons

 

The following are some of the cons of wood doors:

 

Maintenance: To prevent weathering, wood doors need to be stained or painted on a regular basis.

 

Weight: Solid wood doors may be more expensive than those constructed of other materials in terms of cost.

 

Vulnerability to moisture: Wooden doors are known to sag over time and get heavy since they are not energy efficient.

 

Price

 

The average market price for Mahogany Wooden Doors is 8000 INR/piece in India.

 

Fiberglass

 

Fiberglass doors offer a practical solution for those seeking both durability and versatility. They are resistant to warping, cracking, and harsh weather conditions, making them ideal for exterior use.

 

Benefits and drawbacks of fiberglass doors

 

To determine if Fiberglass doors will really suit your needs, let us look at its benefits and drawbacks.

 

Benefits

 

The following are some benefits of Fiberglass doors:

 

●  Robustness: Exceptionally robust and resistant to dents, scratches, and rot are fiberglass doors.

 

●  Low maintenance: They demand little maintenance and don't require frequent painting or staining.

 

●  Great Insulation: Fiberglass doors' excellent insulation helps to save energy usage. 

 

Drawbacks

 

The following are some drawbacks of Fiberglass doors:

 

●  Limited personalization: Compared to wood doors, fiberglass ones could provide fewer design options.

 

●  Cost: Fiberglass doors can still be more expensive than some other materials like steel, although still less expensive than solid wood.

 

●  Complex Installation: Fiberglass doors are complex to install and are generally recommended to be installed by professionals only.

 

Price

 

The average market price for Fiberglass Doors is 1490 INR/square meter in India.

 

Steel

 

Steel doors are a common option for exterior entryways because of their reputation for strength and protection. However, you need to consider many factors before deciding on steel as your go-to material for doors.

 

Exploring the features of steel doors

 

Here are some of the features of steel doors that you might consider to understand if it's a right fit for you or not:

 

Security: Steel doors provide good protection against burglars, and intruders because of their inherent robustness.

 

Durability: They offer long-lasting performance since they are resistant to warping, cracking, and rot.

 

Energy efficiency: Foam-cored steel doors help control inside temperatures as they provide good insulation.

 

Price

 

The average market price for Fiberglass Doors is 12400 INR/piece in India.

 

Other material options

 

Since we have explored the most popular ones, i.e., Steel, Wood, and Fiberglass, it’s worthwhile to take a look at a few other popular choices for the type of material used for doors.

 

Glass doors

 

Glass doors give a cheerful and modern touch to your living area and are most effective when used indoors or as inserts inside of outside doors. They come in a variety of designs, such as transparent, frosted, and stained glass.

 

Price

 

The average market price for Frameless Glass Doors is 4100 INR/unit in India.

 

Aluminum doors

 

Aluminum doors are known to be corrosion-proof, lightweight, and low maintenance. They have a clean and contemporary design and are usually used for sliding or patio doors.

 

Price

 

The average market price for Aluminium Doors is 250 INR/square foot in India.

 

Composite doors

 

Composite doors are engineered with the combination of several materials with a few of these being wood, fiberglass, and foam. These doors give off a wood-like appearance while being more durable, weatherproof, and efficient in terms of energy use.

 

Price

 

The average market price for Composite Doors is 4000 INR/piece in India.

 

Door Styles and Designs

 

Now that you have a grasp of the materials available, let's explore the different door styles and designs that can elevate the look of your home.

 

Traditional doors

 

Traditional doors, such as panel doors and Dutch doors, are timeless choices that offer a classic and charming appeal. The typical traditional doors include the Panel and the Dutch doors.

 

Panel doors

 

Panel doors are classic and adaptable in nature. They have raised or flat panels that give their surface depth and texture.

 

The average price of a wooden door panel in India is 5000 INR/piece.

 

Dutch doors

 

Dutch doors have a horizontal division that makes it possible for the top and bottom halves to open separately. They are ideal for enhancing entryways' appeal and usefulness.

 

The average price of Dutch doors in India is 400 INR/square feet.

 

Modern doors

 

Modern doors are one of the most popular choices for doors by millions of homeowners. With that being said, let’s explore the most popular modern doors - Flush doors and Pivot doors.

 

i) Flush doors

 

The flush doors have smooth and flat surfaces, with no raised or recessed sections, giving them a modern, simplistic appearance.

 

The average price of Flush doors in India is 3650 INR/piece.

 

ii) Pivot doors

 

The pivot doors pivot on a pivot hinge making them a stunning and distinctive entry. They are perfect for huge, contemporary doors.

 

The average price of Pivot doors in India is 550 INR/kg.

 

Contemporary doors

 

Sliding doors and French doors are popular choices for those seeking a seamless connection between indoor and outdoor spaces.

 

i) Sliding doors

 

Sliding doors slide horizontally on tracks and are perfect for maximizing space while allowing natural light to flood in.

 

The average price of Sliding Aluminum doors in India is 750 INR/square feet.

 

ii) French doors

 

French doors are made of several glass panels that are hinged together to create a classic and luxurious entry. These are frequently used for patios or as internal doors.

 

The average price of UPVC French doors in India is 450 INR/square feet.

 

Choosing the Right Door Size

 

Your home deserves a door that is a perfect fit to reap most of its benefits. We have listed some of the steps you can follow to measure your door precisely and find the perfect fit.

 

How to measure your door opening accurately

 

Take the following actions to measure your door opening precisely:

 

●  Width of the door: The width should be measured at the doorway's top, center, and bottom. For accuracy, use the smallest measurement possible.

 

●  Height of the door: Take many measurements and use the smallest one to get the height from the floor to the top of the doorway.

 

●  The thickness of the door: Measuring the edge of the door will provide its thickness. 

 

Standard door sizes vs. custom-made doors

 

Standard door sizes are more widely accessible and more affordable, but custom doors are created in order to fit certain openings and provide more design options and provide a tailored fit.

 

Factors influencing door size selection

 

Take into account elements including your home's architectural design, the door's intended use, and any accessibility needs that may have an impact on the door's size.

 

Understanding Door Hardware

 

Door hardware plays an important role in both style and functionality. Some of the door hardware includes handles, knobs, hinges, and locks.

 

Handles and knobs

 

Knobs and handles come in different shapes and forms catering to various door styles. Let us understand these aspects a bit better.

 

Different types of handles/knobs

 

A few of the many varieties of door handles and knobs available are the following:

 

●  Lever handles

●  Round knobs

●  Privacy door knobs

●  Dummy door levers

●  Passage door levers

 

It is always recommended to select a design that is simple to use and enhances the appearance of your door.

 

Matching hardware to door style

 

The door’s hardware complementing its design is important to finish the look and overall appearance. For example, contemporary and streamlined handle designs often go well with modern doors, whereas more opulent hardware may work better with traditional doors.

 

Hinges and locks

 

Hinges and locks are important components to ensure the security and smooth operation of your door. So, it's best to do good research on these before finalizing on your door.

 

Types and functionalities

 

The door can swing open and shut thanks to hinges. To sustain the weight of the door, pick sturdy hinges that are the right size. Deadbolt locks for your doors can provide improved security and compatibility.

 

Finishing Options and Treatments

 

Working on the door finishing is almost as important as choosing the type of doors, parts, materials, and hardware. So, go ahead and dive into the world of paint, stains, and varnishes.

 

Paint

 

Choosing the right paint color

 

Choosing a paint color that goes well with both the interior and outside design of your house is always recommended. Colors that are neutral like grey, black, and brown tend to be adaptable to almost all types of doors and last a long time.

 

Painting tips and techniques

 

Some door painting tips and techniques are the following:

 

i) Properly prepare the surface for a smooth and even finish.

 

ii) Use a primer if necessary.

 

iii) Consider using several thin coats of paint.

 

Enhancing Doors’ Beauty with Stains

 

Stains enhance wood's beauty and inherent grains. It is always a good idea to select a stain color that goes with the style you want, followed by adding a clear finish for further protection.

 

Protecting and preserving doors with Varnish and Clear Finishes

 

Clear coatings like varnishes and polyurethane preserve the beauty of the wood and shield the door from moisture and UV deterioration.

 

Maintaining and Caring for Your Door

 

Now that you have finished selecting the right door for yourself and probably got it installed as well, it’s time to understand some tips to maintain and care for your favorite doors!

 

Cleaning techniques and maintenance schedules

 

Consider using mild soap and water to clean the door on a regular basis. Apart from this, always adhere to the manufacturer's maintenance guidelines.

 

Prevention of damage and wear

 

Some things to keep in mind to reduce wear and tear:

 

●  Avoid slamming the door.

 

●  Make sure the hinges and locks are properly greased.

 

●  Consider adding a door jam protector to door jams.

 

Addressing common issues and repairs

 

Take care of small faults right away to avoid bigger difficulties like the following:

 

●  Tightening up loose hinges

 

●  Restoring door alignment

 

●  Getting rid of moisture and water sources near and around your doors

 

Conclusion

 

Selecting the ideal door for your house forms an integral part of house construction and renovation in terms of its appearance, use, and security. Take into account elements like architectural style, materials, designs, and hardware alternatives to find your ideal fit.

You can make sure that the door serves you well for many years to come by properly maintaining the door and finding the right suppliers and professionals to consult and get the doors installed. Contact Foot2Feet to get expert advice, consultation, and installation for your doors and build a perfect home today!

 

FAQs

 

1. Which door is best for the bedroom?

 

Some of the best options for doors for bedrooms are Double wooden doors made of solid wood and glass doors that are either fully made of glass or combined with wood or metal.

 

2. Are there any eco-friendly door options available?

 

A few eco-friendly and energy-efficient door options are wood-clad steel, fiberglass, or painted steel filled with a core of polyurethane foam.

 

3. Which door is best wooden or plywood?

 

In terms of strength and aesthetics, wooden doors certainly take the win over plywood but plywood is preferred if ease of maintenance is the main goal.

 

4. Which wood is best for the main door?

 

Sheesham wood is commonly used in main doors in India as it is considered to be the strongest wood.

 

5. Which door material provides the best sound insulation?

 

One of the best choices for sound insulation is Fiberglass doors. A few other choices include STC doors, which are generally used in environments like the military, and rigid steel doors to introduce a great range of sound insulation.

 

References

 

●  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-coordinate-your-front-door-rest-homes-exterior-marc h-8/

 

●  https://www.europeancabinets.com/news/tips-choosing-front-door/

 

●  https://fordewindowsandremodeling.com/blog/blog/6-factors-to-consider-when-choosing- a-door-for-your-home/

 

●  https://residential-acoustics.com/how-to-soundproof-a-door-interior-exterior-door-soundproofing/

 

●  https://mccoymart.com/post/different-types-of-wood-for-doors/

 

●  https://www.brickandbatten.com/pros-and-cons-of-wooden-door/

 

●  https://www.southernfront.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-a-fiberglass-doors/

 

●  https://theconstructor.org/building/building-material/what-are-steel-doors/560184/

 

●  https://www.aisglass.com/reasons-why-it-is-advised-to-have-frosted-glass-door-for-your-entrance/

 

●  https://www.aiswindows.com/5-amazing-features-of-aluminium-doors-to-transform-your-home/

 

●  https://www.everest.co.uk/doors/grp/what-is-a-composite-door/#:~:text=A%20composite%20door%20is%20made,stronger%20than%20the%20individual%20components.

 

●  https://hullworks.com/know-your-doors-paneled-doors/

 

●  https://www.schlage.com/blog/categories/2017/06/dutch-doors.html#:~:text=Dutch%20doors%20are%20essentially%20a,door%20as%20one%20when%20needed.

 

●  https://www.enfielddoors.co.uk/what-are-flush-doors/#:~:text=Flush%20doors%20are%2

0simple%20door,more%20commonly)%20but%20also%20exterior.

 

●  https://www.livingetc.com/advice/pivot-doors

 

●  https://www.aiswindows.com/characteristics-of-sliding-doors/

 

●  https://www.renewmywindows.com/blog/all-about-french-doors-features-and-benefits/

 

●  https://www.pella.com/ideas/doors/entry-doors/how-to-measure-front-door/#:~:text=Measure%20from%20one%20side%20to,the%20edge%20of%20the%20door.

 

●  https://woodnco.com/blog/are-custom-doors-worth-it

 

●  https://www.homedepot.com/c/ab/types-of-door-knobs/9ba683603be9fa5395fab904c219eca

 

●  https://uapcorporate.com/how-to-choose-the-right-door-hinge/

 

Buildings of Smart Fin Tech Centre in UDCPR 2020

Rule No.7.12 Buildings of Smart Fin-Tech Centre

 

i) The Authority may permit additional FSI up to 200% over and above the basic permissible FSI to Smart Fin-Tech Centre located in Residential/Industrial/Commercial Zone, which have been approved by the Directorate of Information Technology, proposed to be set up (hereinafter referred to as the "said unit") by charging premium of 20% of the land rate for the said land as prescribed in Annual Statement of Rates for the relevant year of granting such additional FSI.

 

Provided that additional FSI shall be permissible only on plots having an access road of a minimum of 18.0 m. width and subject to approval by a committee chaired by the Principal Secretary, Information Technology, and comprising representatives of Industries, Finance and Urban Development Department (UD-1).

 

Provided further that, the premium so collected shall be shared between the Planning Authority and the Government in the proportion of 50: 50. The share of the Government shall be deposited in the Fin-Tech Corpus fund which is being set up by the Director of Information Technology.

 

(Explanation: Premium charges shall be calculated based on the value of lands under such zones, determined by considering the land rates of the said land as prescribed in the Annual Statement of Rates (ASR). These charges shall be paid at the time of permitting additional FSI by considering the ASR for the relevant year without applying the guidelines).

 

ii) The total maximum permissible FSI shall not exceed the limit of 3.00. In case of plot fronting on roads having a width of 24.0 m. or more, the FSI may be permitted to be exceeded upto 4.00.

 

iii) No amenity space is required to be left for the development of plot/land up to 2.00 hectares for the Smart Fin-Tech Centre.

 

iv) At least 85% of the total proposed Built-up area (excluding parking area) shall be permitted for the business of Fin-Tech (start-ups, incubators, and accelerators), banking and financial service including NBFC and insurance, and IT/ITES with focus on Fin-Tech.

 

v) The Directorate of Information Technology will develop a web portal on which the developer of every Smart Fin-Tech Centre will be bound to provide/update detailed information about the names of the units in the park, utilization of built-up area, and activities being carried out, manpower employed in the Smart Fin-Tech Centre on a yearly basis.

 

vi) If a Smart Fin-Tech Centre has availed additional FSI as per the provisions of this regulation and subsequently it is found that the built-up space in the Smart Fin-Tech Centre is being used for non-Fin-Tech / commercial activities / any other activity, not permitted as per the Smart Fin-Tech Centre policy under which the said Centre was approved, a penal action as below will be taken, the payment shall be shared between the Authority and the Government in the ratio of 3:1.

a) The misuse shall be ascertained by physical site verification of the said Smart Fin-Tech Centre policy by a team of officers from the Directorate of Information Technology and the Authority, which has approved the building plans of the said Smart Fin-Tech Centre.

 

b) A per day penalty equal to 0.3% of the prevailing ready reckoner value of the built-up area that has been found to be used for non-Fin-Tech activities, shall be imposed.

 

c) The penalty will be recovered from the date of commencement of unauthorized use till the day of non-Fin-Tech activities.

 

After payment of the penalty to the Authority, which has sanctioned the building plans of the concerned Smart Fin-Tech Centre, the said Smart Fin-Tech Centre will restore the use of premises to the original purpose for which LOI / Registration was granted. If the Smart Fin-Tech Centre fails to pay the penalty and/or restore the use to its original intended use, the Authority will take suitable action under the Maharashtra Regional and Town Planning Act, 1966, against the erring Smart Fin-Tech Centre under intimation to the Directorate of Information Technology. These provisions will be over and above the penal provisions of the M.R. & T.P. Act, 1966.

 

vii) In this regulation the terms and expression shall have the meaning specified in the Fin-Tech Policy declared by the Directorate of Information Technology vide Govt. Resolution No.DIT- 2018/CR-17/D-1/39, dated 16th February, 2018. Notwithstanding anything contained in the existing regulation, the above provisions shall be applicable to the Smart FinTech Centre.

 

Other provisions of existing regulations, which are not specifically mentioned in this regulation, shall be applicable.

 

Related Regulations to Rule No. 7

 

Rule No. 7.0 in UDCPR 2020

 

Entitlement of FSI for Road Widening or Construction of New Roads or Surrender of Reserved Land in UDCPR 2020

 

Development and Redevelopment Of Staff Quarters Of the State Government or Its Statuary Bodies or Planning Authority in UDCPR 2020

 

Development and Redevelopment of Housing Schemes of Maharashtra Housing Area Development Authority in UDCPR 2020

 

Redevelopment of Existing Buildings in UDCPR 2020

 

Development of Housing for EWS and LIG in UDCPR 2020

 

Regulations for Development of Information Technology Establishment, Data Centers in UDCPR 2020

 

Regulation for Development of Biotechnology Parks in UDCPR 2020

 

Incentive for Green Buildings in UDCPR 2020

 

Commercial Buildings in CBD, Commercial, Residential Zone in Planning Authorities Areas in UDCPR 2020

 

Alternatives Materials, Methods of Design and Construction and Tests in UDCPR 2020

UDCPR 2020 Chapter 12 is all about the Structural Safety, Water supply, Drainage, and Sanitary Requirements, Outdoor Display, And Other Services in Development Plans as per mentioned in the UDCPR 

 

This is Applicable to all Planning Authorities and Regional Plan Areas except Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, Other Planning Authorities/Special Planning Authorities/ Development Authorities within the limit of Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, MIDC, NAINA, Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust, Hill Station Municipal Councils, Eco-sensitive/Eco-fragile region notified by MoEF & CC and Lonavala Municipal Council, in Maharashtra.

 

Rule No. 12.3 Alternatives Materials, Methods of Design, Construction and Tests

 

1) The provision of the regulations is not intended to prevent the use of any material or method of design or construction, not specifically prescribed by the regulations, provided any such alternative has been approved.

 

2) The provision of these regulations is also not intended to prevent the adoption for architectural planning and layout conceived as an integrated development scheme.

 

3) The authority may approve any such alternative provided it is found that the proposed alternative is satisfactory and conform to the provisions of relevant parts regarding material, design, and construction and that material, method or work offered is, for the purpose intended, at least equivalent to that prescribed in the rules in quality, strength, compatibility, effectiveness, fire rating and resistance, durability and safety.

 

4) Tests : Whenever there is insufficient evidence of compliance with the provisions of the regulations of evidence that any material or method of design or construction does not conform to the requirements of the rules or in order to substantiate claims for alternative materials, design or methods of construction, the Authority may require tests sufficient in advance as proof of compliance. These tests shall be made by an approved agency at the expense of the owner.

 

5) The test method shall be as specified by the regulations for the materials or design or construction in question. If there are no appropriate test methods specified in the regulations, the Authority shall determine the test procedure. For methods of testing for building materials, references may be made to relevant Indian standards as given by the National Building Code of India, published by the Bureau of Indian Standards. The latest version of the National Building Code of India shall be taken into account at the time of enforcement of these rules.

 

6) Copies of the results of all such tests shall be retained by the authority for a period of not less than two years after the acceptance of the alternative material.

 

Related Regulations

 

You can visit our other blogs related to Regulations 12 through the below-mentioned links

 

Signs and Outdoor Display Structures in UDCPR 2020

 

Drainage and Sanitation Requirements in UDCPR 2020

 

Water Supply, Drainage, and Sanitary Requirements in UDCPR 2020

 

Building Services in UDCPR 2020

 

Quality of Materials and Workmanship in UDCPR 2020

 

Structural Safety, Water Supply, Drainage and Sanitary Requirements, Outdoor Display, and Other Services in UDCPR 2020

 

Setback, Marginal, Distance, Height in Non Congested Area in Maharashtra in UDCPR 2020

For the construction of any building, there is a restriction of floor space to be used. It is called the FSI (Floor space Index). Also, we have to provide distance from the plot boundary which is called as marginal distance or setbacks.

 

UDCPR 2020 Chapter 6 is all about Regulations for FSI & Marginal distance.

 

This is Applicable to all Planning Authorities and Regional Plan Areas except Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, Other Planning Authorities / Special Planning Authorities / Development Authorities within the limit of Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, MIDC, NAINA, Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust, Hill Station Municipal Councils, Eco-sensitive / Eco-fragile region notified by MoEF & CC and Lonavala Municipal Council, in Maharashtra.

 

Rule No. 6.2 Regulations For Outside Congested Area (Non-Congested Area)
 

6.2.1 Marginal Distances and Setbacks for Residential Buildings and Mixed Use with Height up to 15.0 m. or as mentioned in the Table No.6-D.

 

The provisions for minimum marginal distances, as given in Table No.6-D below, shall apply to the Residential buildings, Residential with mixed uses permissible in the Residential Zone, and Residential buildings permissible in other zones.

 

Table No. 6-D

Sr. NoDescription of the roadMin. Plot Size in sq.m.Min. width of the plot in metersMin. setback from the roadside in metersMin. side margins in metersMin. rear marg- ins in metersRemarks
12345678
1Roads of width 30.0 m. and above in local authority area.450156.0 in the case of A, B, and C class Municipal Corporations and 4.50 in the case of other areas.3.03.0Side and Rear Margins for building up to 15.0 m. height (excluding parking floor up to 6 m. height)
2In the case of the Regional Plan area. NH / SH450154.5 or as specified by Highway rules, whichever is more.3.03.0Side and Rear Margins for building up to 15.0 m. height (excluding parking floor up to 6.0 m. height)
3Roads of width 18.0 m. and above but below 30.0 m.250104.52.02.0Side and Rear Margins for building up to 10.0 m. height (excluding parking floor up to 6.0 m. height)
4Roads of width 15.0 m. and above but below 18.0 m200103.01.51.5Margins for buildings
G + 2 or stilt + 3 structure
5Roads of width less than 15.0 m.8063.0

1.5
(in the case of

semi-detached building, only one side marginal distance shall be permissible

1.5Margins for buildings
G + 2 or stilt + 3 structure
6

Row Housing

on roads of

12.0 m. and below

303.52.250.0
(In case of corner plot, 1.50 or building line of adjoining road, whichever is more)
1.5-- do --
7Row Housing for EWS / LIG / by public authority / private individual / Slum Upgradation, etc. by public authority203.00.9 from the pathway or 2.25 from the road boundary0.0
(In case of corner plot, 1.5 or building line of adjoining road, whichever is more)
0.9G + 1 or stilt + 2 structure only

 

Notes :-

 

(1)  The width of the road in the above table shall govern the requirements in columns 3 to 8.

 

(2)  In the case of Sr.No.1 to 6, structures having higher height may be permitted subject to marginal distance mentioned in Regulation No.6.2.3.

 

(3)  The minimum area of plots fronting on service roads along highways shall be with reference to the actual width of the service road.

 

(4)  For semi-detached buildings, the side margin shall be on one side only. Plots for semi-detached buildings shall be in pairs.

 

(5)  Row-housing plots at the junction of two roads shall be larger to maintain the setback from both roads. Not more than 12 and not less than 3 plots shall be allowed in each block of row housing. Each block shall be separated from the other by a 4.5 m. wide road/pathway or 4.5 m. side marginal distance within the plot or space, including side marginal distance of the plot.

 

(6)  No garage shall be permitted in a building having a stilt or basement provided for parking.

 

(7)  Construction of ottas, railings, barricades, or supporting columns for canopy or porch shall not be allowed in minimum front marginal distances. However, steps may be permitted within 1.2 m. from the building line. Also, supporting columns for the canopy or porch may be allowed within the building line.

 

(8)  In the case of Regional Plan areas, ribbon development rules shall not be relaxed without the consent of the Highway Authority.

 

(9)  In the case of special buildings, marginal distances shall be as per regulations for such buildings.

 

(10)  The plot width-to-depth ratio shall be 1 : 1.5 to 1 : 2.5, as far as possible in the plotted layout.

 

(11)  In Public Housing Schemes for E.W.S. undertaken by government or semi-government organizations, marginal distances shall be as per the respective schemes and rules.

 

(12)  The front setback set out in already approved and partially developed layouts/schemes, may be retained as per original approval, to maintain the building line.

 

(13)  The pattern of development, like semi-detached, row housing, etc., in the already approved layout shall be as per said approved layout.

 

(14)  Where commencement certificate is granted prior to publication of draft development plan or sanction of Development Plan and the plot gets affected by new road/road widening, proposed in the development plan, the front margin shall stand relaxed to that extent.

 

(15)  In case of redevelopment proposal affected by line of street up to 9.0 m. width under the Municipal Council or Municipal Corporation Act or development plan road of up to 9.0 m. width, the front margin shall stand relaxed to the extent of land affected by such proposal (1) subject to a minimum setback of 1.0 m. for roads having a width of 12.0 m. or less and 2.0 m. for roads having a width of more than 12.0 m., from the final line of the street.

 

(16)  Subsidiary structures such as garages (limited to one), outhouses, and independent sanitary blocks may be permitted only in plots having an area of 250 sq.m. or more.

 

(17)  Rear or side marginal distances for development along nallah or watercourses shall be subject to Regulation regarding “Sites Not Eligible for Construction of Building” and “Construction Within Flood Line”. (Chapter 3)

 

(18)  The plots which are substandard in area shall be developed as per marginal distances mentioned in the above table with reference to road width.

 

(19)  In case of plots having approach by dead-end road, (point access) front margin shall be limited to the width of point access.

 

(20) Building Line along classified roads, as mentioned in Regulation No.3.1.6, shall be applicable for residential buildings defined in Regulation No.1.3.93(i), and Control Line along classified roads shall be applicable for other uses or for commercial uses as mentioned in Regulation No.3.1.6 or for mixed-use buildings where non-residential uses are proposed at least 50% or more of total proposed built-up area.

 

Rule No. 6.2.2 Other Buildings

 

The Provision in respect of minimum road width, minimum marginal distances, etc., as given in Table No.6-E below, shall apply for different categories of other buildings.

 

Table No. 6. E

Sr. No

No

Type of building

Minimum road width requiredMinimum marginal distancesOther stipulations
12345
1.Medical buildings
 a) Hospital, Maternity Homes, Health Club, Clinics, etc., buildings not being special buildings9.0 m. in case of A, B, C class Municipal Corporation, Metropolitan Authority Area and 7.5 m. in case of other areas.Margins as per Table No.6-D subject to side marginal distance of the minimum 3.0 m.NIL
 b) Hospital, Maternity Homes, Health Clubs, etc. buildings under the category of special building.Road width as required for Special Buildings. (Regulation No.3.3.9)6.0 m. on all sidesHeight of the building is subject to provisions of the the Maharashtra Fire Prevention and Life Safety Measures Act 2006.
2.Educational buildings
 a) Pre-primary SchoolOn any road.Margins as per Table No.6-D

Other requirements shall be as mentioned in the Table No.7-A of Regulation No.7.1.

Height of the building is subject to provisions of the Maharashtra Fire Prevention and Life Safety Measures Act 2006.

 b) Primary School not being a special building.6.0 m.-- do --
 c) Other educational buildings are not special buildings.9.0 m.3.0 m. on all sides
 d) Any building of category a, b, c above being a special building.Road width as required for Special Buildings6.0 m. on all sides
3.Public-Semi Public Building
 a) The Public-Semi Public Building is not The heightThe height,a special building.9.0 m.Margins as per Table No.6-D subject to side marginal distance of a minimum of 3.0 m. 
 b) Public-Semi Public Building being a special buildingRoad width as required for Special Buildings6.0 m. on all sides 
4.Cinema Theatre
 Cinema Theatre / Drama Theatre / Assembly Hall / Multiplex / Shopping Malls12.0 m.Front - 12.0 m. (only on one major road). 6.0 m. on all remaining sides

i) In case of cities having a population more than 2.5 lakhs as per the latest census, redevelopment of existing cinema theatre on plots shall be allowed subject to the condition that at least 1/3rd of the existing seats shall be retained, which shall not be below 150 seats and may be developed in combination with user permissible in R-2 zone.

ii) For the redevelopment of the existing theatre, marginal distances, including the front margin as per these regulations shall not be insisted upon. Redevelopment shall be allowed as per existing setback distances. Parking areas required as per these regulations shall not be insisted on; however, existing parking areas shall be maintained.

iii) In cases where redevelopment of the existing Cinema Theatre is carried out on the same place with a capacity more than the existing capacity in the form of single or multiscreen cinemas, then the owner/developer shall be allowed FSI potential mentioned in columns 6 or 9, as the case may be, of Table No.6-G at the rate of 20% land rate mentioned in Annual Rates of Statement without considering guidelines therein, for the additional capacity.

iv) The existing Cinema Theatre shall be allowed to be relocated and constructed at some other place within a distance of 5 km. In such case, the original site shall be allowed to be developed as per uses permissible in the adjoining zone.

Construction of Cinema Theatre / Multiplex shall conform to the provisions of Maharashtra Cinema (Regulations) Rules, 1966, and as amended from time to time, except the provisions mentioned above.

v) For the redevelopment of a Cinema plot having an area less than 1000 Sq.m., and if redevelopment of existing cinema theatre on such plot is not possible considering the other requirements in these regulations, the condition of providing at least 1/3rdof the existing seats or minimum 150 seats for cinema theatre shall not be insisted. In such cases, users permissible in adjoining predominant zones shall be permissible with special permission of the sanctioning authority.

5. Mangal Karyalaya
 a) Mangal Karyalaya and like buildings not under the category of special buildings.Road width as required for R-2 zone.3.0 m. on all sides. 
 b) Mangal karyalaya and like buildings under the category of special buildings.

12.0 m.

 

6.0 m. on all sides. 
6. Fuel Stations
 Fuel Filling Stations / including Petrol / Ethanol / LPG / CNG etc., Public Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles with or without service bay9.0 m.4.5 m. on all sides

i) In case the plot is located on any Classified road in the Regional Plan area, the distance from the junction of roads as may be specified by the Indian Road Congress/ Ministry of Road, Transport and Highway, shall be followed. (IRC guideline 2009 and MORTH Letter No.RW/NH-33023/19/99-DOIII, Dated 25.09.2003 as amended from time to time)

ii) NOC from the Chief Controller of Explosives shall be necessary.

iii) In a plot of Fuel Filling Station, other buildings or composite buildings for sales offices, snack bars, restaurants, public conveniences, the or like activities may be permitted.

The FSI shall not exceed 0.25 and underground structures along with kiosks shall not be counted towards FSI.

7. Mercantile Buildings.
 a) Mercantile / Business / Hotel / Commercial building under the category of special buildings.Road width as required for Special Building.Front 6.0 m. Side & rear 6.0 m.

i) Shops may also face on side and rear of a plot.

ii) Minimum width and area of the Shop shall be as per the convenience of the owner/developer.

iii) In case of construction of shops/offices only on the ground floor (not being a special building) side and rear marginal distance shall be as per Table No.6-D.

 b) Mercantile / Business / Hotel / Commercial building not under the the category of special buildingsRoad width as required for R-2 zone.Margins as per Table No.6- D subject to side marginal distance of a minimum 3.0 m.
 c) Shopping is convenient in the R-1 zone.On any road.Margins as per Table No.6- D.-
8. Stadium   
 Stadium with Pavilion12.0 m.6.0 m. on all sidesThe covered portion of the spectator’s gallery shall not exceed 25% of the plot area, which shall not be counted towards FSI. Shops below the spectator’s gallery may be permitted which shall not be counted towards FSI. In addition to this, ancillary offices, sports person accommodations, and public convenience-like structures may also be permitted which shall not consume more than 0.10 FSI on the gross plot area.

 

Note :

 

i)  In case of plots fronting on National Highways, State Highways, and Major District Roads in the Regional Plan area, the building line shall be as per Ribbon Development Rules or as given in the accommodations above, whichever is more.

 

ii)  Side and rear marginal distances mentioned in the above Table shall be subject to Regulation No.6.2.3, whichever is more.

 

iii)  In the case of special buildings, marginal distances shall be as per regulations for special buildings.

 

iv)  A stadium should desirably accommodate 400 m. running track.

 

v)  For the above buildings, permissible FSI shall be as per Regulation No. 6.3, unless otherwise

specified above.

 

vi) Point access (approach by dead-end road) to a plot shall be considered for the minimum road

width requirement mentioned in the above table. In such a case, the front margin shall be applicable for

the width of the point access road.


vi) The provisions about Cinema Theatre in column 5 of Table No.6-E shall be applicable to

Cinema Theatres in congested areas also.

 

Rule No. 6.2.3 Marginal distances for buildings of heights more than mentioned in Table No.6-D of Regulation No.6.2.1

 

(a) Front Margin - The front margin shall be as given in Table No.6-D and shall be applicable to a building irrespective of its height.

 

Provided that, in the case of group housing schemes where the building abuts an internal road, the minimum is 3.0 m. set back from the internal road or distance between two buildings, whichever is more, shall be provided. For Development/Regional Plan roads or classified roads or through roads, passing through Group Housing Schemes, the setback as prescribed in these regulations shall be provided.

 

(b) Side or rear marginal distance - Side or rear marginal distance in relation to the height of the building for light and ventilation shall be as below :-

 

The marginal distance on all sides shall be as per Table No.6-D / Table No.6-E for building height or floors mentioned therein. For height, more than stipulated in Table No.6-D / Table No.6-E, the marginal distance on all sides, except the front side of a building, shall be a minimum H / 5 (Where H = Height of the building above ground level).

 

Provided that, such marginal distance shall be subject to a maximum of 12.0 m. from the plot boundary, and the distance between two buildings shall be (1) as per Regulation No.6.2.4.

 

Provided further that, in case of redevelopment of the building which has ceased to exist in consequence of accidental fire / natural collapse/demolition for the reason of the same having been declared dangerous or dilapidated or unsafe by or under a lawful order of the authority or building having an age of more than 30 years, such marginal distance may be allowed upto 6.0 m. for a height of building upto 45 m. For the redevelopment of smaller plots having an area less than 1000 sq.m., one of the side margins/rear margins of 6.0 m may be relaxed subject to Fire NOC in case of bonafide hardship.

 

Provided further that, such marginal distance from recreational open space shall be 3.0 m. in case of non-special buildings and 6.0 m. in case of special buildings, irrespective of its height.

 

Provided further that, the building height for the purposes of this regulation and for calculating the marginal distances shall be exclusive of the height of parking floors up to 6.0 m.

 

Provided further that, where rooms do not derive light and ventilation from the exterior open space, i.e., dead walls, such marginal distance may be reduced (1) to 6.0 m. in the case of a special buildings and 3.0 m. in the case of other buildings.

 

Provided further that the plot/land of the owner falls within the jurisdiction of more than one authority, then continuous building (without leaving a margin on the boundary of the authorities) may be allowed with the consent of the other Authorities.

 

(c) Provision for Step Margin :- Step margins may be allowed to be provided on upper floors to achieve required side or rear marginal distances as mentioned in these regulations subject to a minimum marginal distance of 6.0 m. on ground level in case of special building.

This provision shall also be applicable to congested areas.

 

Rule No. 6.2.4  In the cases of layouts of two or more buildings in a plot for any uses :-

 

Distance between two buildings :- The distance between two buildings shall be the side / rear marginal distance required for the taller building between the two adjoining buildings.

Provided that, the pathway / internal road may be allowed to be proposed in such marginal distance.

 

Rule No. 6.2.5

In the case of a group housing scheme where the building abuts on an internal road, the minimum is 3.0 m. set back from the internal road or distance between two buildings, whichever is more shall be provided. For Development plan road/Regional plan road or classified road or through road, passing through Group Housing Scheme, normal setback as prescribed in the regulations shall be provided.

 

Rule No. 6.2.6  Buildings Abutting Two or More Streets

When a Building abuts two or more streets, the setbacks from the streets shall be such as if the building is fronting on each of such streets.

 

 

Related Regulations to Rule No.6 - 

 

You can visit our other blogs on regulations through the below-mentioned links:

 

Regulations for Height of Building in UDCPR 2020?

 

What is the Calculation of FSI Pline and its exemption in UDCPR 2020?

 

What are the Projections allowed in Front and Side Margin as per UDCPR 2020?

 

Industrial Building Regulations of FSI, Marginal Distances and Plot Area in UDCPR 2020

 

Regulations for Permissible FSI in Non Congested Area In Maharashtra in UDCPR 2020

 

What are the Setback, Marginal, Distance, Height, and Permissible FSI in Gaothan or Congested Area in Maharashtra in UDCPR 2020

 

Regulations for Permissible FSI in Non Congested Area In Maharashtra in UDCPR 2020

For the construction of any building, there is a restriction of floor space to be used. It is called as FSI (Floor space Index). Also, we have to provide distance from the plot boundary which is called as marginal distance or setbacks.

 

UDCPR 2020 Chapter 6 is all about Regulations for FSI & Marginal distance.

 

This is Applicable to all Planning Authorities and Regional Plan Areas except Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, Other Planning Authorities / Special Planning Authorities / Development Authorities within the limit of Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai, MIDC, NAINA, Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust, Hill Station Municipal Councils, Eco-sensitive / Eco-fragile region notified by MoEF & CC and Lonavala Municipal Council, in Maharashtra.

 

Rule No. 6.3 Permissible FSI

 

Permissible basic FSI, additional FSI on payment of premium, Permissible TDR Loading on a plot in a non-congested area for Residential and Residential with mixed uses and other buildings in developable zones like residential, commercial, public-semi-public, etc. shall be as given in Table 6-G below :-

 

Table 6-G 

Sr. No.Road width in metersBasic FSIFor all Municipal Corporations (2) CIDCO as Planning Authority by Virtue of NTDAFor remaining Authorities/Areas
   FSI on payment of premiumMaximum permissible TDR loadingMaximum building potential on plot, including in-situ FSIFSI on payment of premiumMaximum permissible TDR loadingMaximum building potential on plot, including in-situ FSI
123456789
1Below 9.0 m.1.10----1.10----1.10
29.0 m. and above but below 12.0 m.1.100.500.402.000.300.301.70
312.0 m. and above but below 15.0 m.1.100.500.652.250.300.602.00
415.0 m. and above but below 24.0 m.1.100.500.902.500.300.702.10
524.0 m. and above but below 30.0 m.1.100.501.152.750.300.902.30
630.0 m. and above1.100.501.403.000.301.102.50

 

Note –

 

i)  In addition to the above, ancillary area FSI up to the extent of 60% of the proposed FSI in the development permission (including Basic FSI, Premium FSI, and TDR but excluding the area covered in Regulation No.6.8) shall be allowed with the payment of premium as specified in Regulation No.6.1.1.This shall be applicable to all buildings in all zones.


Provided that in case of non-residential use, the extent of ancillary area FSI shall be up to 80%. No separate calculation shall be required to be done for this ancillary area FSI. The entire FSI in the development permission shall be calculated and shall be measured with reference to permissible FSI, premium FSI, TDR, and additional FSI including ancillary area FSI added therein.

Provided further that, this ancillary area FSI shall be applicable to all other schemes like TOD, PMAY, ITP, IT, MHADA, etc., except 

 

Rehabilitation component in SRA. In the result, free of FSI items in the said schemes, if any, other than those mentioned in UDCPR, shall stand deleted.

 

ii)  The column of TDR shall not be applicable for the area, where there is no Planning Authority, and accordingly, values in subsequent columns shall stand modified.

 

iii)  The maximum permissible limits of FSI specified in the Table above, may be allowed to be exceeded in cases mentioned in Chapter 7, where higher FSI is permissible over and above the limit specified in the above table.

 

iv)  Maximum permissible building potential on plot mentioned under column No.6 or 9 shall be exclusive of FSI allowed for Inclusive Housing as per Regulation No.3.8. There is no priority fixed to utilize premium FSI or TDR as mentioned in Column No.4, 5 and 7, 8. (1) However the Authority, considering the local situation, may allow utilization of premium FSI and TDR, in equal proportion of permissible premium FSI and TDR mentioned in column No.4, 5 and 7, 8. (e.g. if out of premium FSI mentioned in column No.4 & 7, 40% is proposed to be utilized then out of TDR mentioned in column No.5 & 8, 40% TDR shall also be utilized.) In such cases the Authority shall issue written, well-reasoned speaking orders to that effect. Other conditions of TDR utilization shall be applicable as per the TDR Regulations No.11.2. In respect of service roads, shown on the development plan or in the approved layout, or plots facing on a major road, however deriving access from other roads, the width of highway or major road shall be considered for entitlement of building potential as per column 6 or 9 of the above table, as the case may be.

 

v)  Out of the quantum of TDR mentioned in Column No.5 or 8 minimum 30% and subject to a maximum 50% of TDR shall be utilized out of the TDR generated from Slum Rehabilitation Scheme (Slum TDR) / Urban Renewal TDR / (2) TDR generated from the area of notified URP as per Regulation No.14.8.8(iv)(c)(i) / Amenity construction TDR (till generation of URT). If such TDR is not available, then other TDR may be used.

 

vi)  The restrictions of road width mentioned above shall not be applicable in cases where, the permissible FSI is more than the basic FSI in various schemes such as slum rehabilitation schemes, redevelopment of dangerous buildings, cluster development for the congested (core) area, redevelopment of MHADA buildings, TOD, etc. in such scheme, regulations of the respective scheme shall be applicable. (3) However, for special buildings, as mentioned in Regulation No.1.3(93)(xiv), provisions mentioned in Regulation No.3.3.9 shall be applicable.

vii)  The maximum limits of FSI prescribed above shall be applicable to (a) fresh permission (viz. Green-field development (i.e., building on a vacant plot of land) and brown-field development (i.e., cases of addition to an existing building where a permissible FSI has not been exhausted.) and also to (b) an existing building that has not been granted full occupation certificate. The cases of existing buildings shall be subject to the production of a stability certificate from the structural engineer.

 

viii) Premium - The rate of premium for the premium F.S.I., as mentioned in Columns No.4 and 7 above shall be 35% of the rate of the said land mentioned in the Annual Statement of Rates without considering the guidelines therein. Apportionment of such amount between Authority and Government shall be as decided by Government from time to time. The government premium, if to be paid, shall be deposited by the Authority in the specified head of government account. In the area of Regional Plans, the entire premium shall be paid to the Government through the District offices of the Town Planning and Valuation Department.

 

ix)  Basic FSI and premium FSI for unauthorisedly subdivided plots having an area of up to 0.4 ha. Shall be (2) 75% of the quantum mentioned in columns No.3, 4 & 7, and the TDR shall be to the extent of 50% of the quantum mentioned in columns No.5 & 8. This provision shall be subject to provisions in Regulation No.3.4.1(i)(a) and (c), wherein the plot shall be entitled for full potential.

 

x)  The utilization of TDR mentioned in the above table would be available to an existing road width of 9.0 m. and above so marked under the relevant Act.

 

xi) For plots regularised under the Maharashtra Gunthewari Development (Regularisation, Upgradation, and Control) Act 2001, these regulations shall apply, and allowance of TDR in columns No.5 and 8 shall be to the extent of 50%. This shall also be applicable for cases mentioned in Regulation No.3.4.1(i)(b).

 

xii) In case plots have an approach by a dead-end road, (point access), the potential of the plot mentioned in the above table shall be permissible if the length of such access road does not exceed 100 m.

 

xiii) If the strip of land/plot adjacent to the road is surrendered by the owner to the authority for road widening, then the benefit of a widened road in terms of building potential, and permissible height shall be granted subject to the condition that such road widening shall result in widening of road from junction of roads (or origin of road) to junction of roads (or T junction).

 

xiv) The entire area of a plot may be considered for calculating the potential of the plot in respect of premium FSI + TDR, but not the basic FSI. Basic FSI shall be calculated on the area of the plot remaining with the owner after deducting area under D.P. road/road widening/reservations and amenity space. This shall be applicable in cases where a reservation area or amenity space is handed over to the authority.

 

xv) If any road of width less than 9.0 m. is proposed to be widened to 9.0 m. by the Authority under the provisions of the Municipal Corporation or Municipal Council Act, by prescribing the line of street considering 4.5 m. from the center line of the existing road and owner of the plot hands over such affected strip along such road to the authority, then he may be entitled to FSI and potentially applicable to 9.0 m. road. (2) This shall be applicable to roads in congested areas also.

 

Rule No. 6.5 FSI Of Green Belt

 

Basic FSI, along with the full potential of premium FSI and TDR of the green belt zone shown on the Development Plan/Regional Plan, may be allowed on the remaining land of the owner by counting the area of the green belt in the gross area of the plot subject to the condition that the area shall always be under tree cover. The owner shall plant trees in this area with proper planning at the rate of a minimum of 100 trees per hectare that should have survived for at least one year prior to issuance of the occupation certificate.

 

Rule No. 6.6 Calculation Of Built-Up Area For The Purposes Of FSI

 

An outer periphery of the construction floor-wise (P-line), including everything but excluding ducts, voids, and items in Regulation No. 6.8, shall be calculated for the purpose of computation of FSI. The open balcony, double-height terraces, and cupboard shall also be included in the P-line of a respective floor, irrespective of its use/function. If part of the stilt, podium, or basement is proposed for habitation purposes or for the construction that is counted in FSI, then such construction shall also be measured in the P-line in that respective floor.

 

 

Related Regulations to Rule No.6 - 

 

You can visit our other blogs on regulations through the below-mentioned links:

 

What are the Regulations for Height of Building in UDCPR 2020?

 

What is the Calculation of FSI Pline and its exemption in UDCPR 2020?

 

What are the Projections allowed in Front and Side Margin as per UDCPR 2020?

 

Industrial Building Regulations of FSI, Marginal Distances and Plot Area in UDCPR 2020

 

What are the Setback, Marginal, Distance, Height in Non Congested Area in Maharashtra in UDCPR 2020

 

What are the Setback, Marginal, Distance, Height, and Permissible FSI in Gaothan or Congested Area in Maharashtra in UDCPR 2020

 

Title and Search Report

 

Know More About Title and Search Report

 

 A title and search report of property is a certificate or search report of the property that states whether the land have any debt or any financial liability or any sort of burden. A title search report (Also known as a Land search report) is very important in many cases such as to check the legal ownership and incase of disputed land.

 

What is Title and Search Report?

 

The title and search report of the property is a certificate stating the ownership of the land. This can be obtained from the advocate of the owner of the property and one can have his advocate inspect the report to find and make sure the title of the property.

 

Who conducts a Title Search and Issues a Report?         

       

It is obtained from the advocate. First, the essential documents such as Ferfar (Transfer of deed), and 7/12 certificate are collected. Then he checks the history from the document like the Loan history of the land, dispute of the land, etc. If the title and search report are required for 30 years then the 30-year-old records of Ferfarare generated. Generally, Search Reports and Title certificates for 13 years and 30 years are considered. Then the advocate gives the Title deed based on the available data.

 

When Title search report of the property is required?

 

In the process of buying and selling property; one who is buying the property asks for the title search report of the property and only after that decides to buy the property. The Title clear land is very important. It is also important in changing the ownership of the property for ex. handing the ownership from husband to wife, Father to son, etc.  These records are kept in ‘ferfar’ means transfer of deed. A title clear report is important in the land registry, Building permission sanctions, when you need the bank loan, and also during RERA registration of projects.

 

What are the document requirements for this service?

 

Mainly there are two documents required to obtain the Search and Title report – the 7/12 certificate (7/12 Extract) and Ferfar (Transfer of deed certificate)

  • Ferfar (Mutation entries) is for checking the ownership transfer history.
  • 7/12 Certificate shows the information about lands such as survey number, area, and many more.

With this minimum list of certificates, you can obtain a search and title report from a registered advocate.

 

Step by step Process for procuring search report –

  1. Obtain the Ferfar certificate from the government revenue department.
  2. Obtain the 7/12 for the number of years you want (the certificate for 7/12 can be generated online and also obtained from the Talathi office after application).
  3. Then advocate studies the documents and drafts a detailed document about the land. For example change of ownership of the land, adjoining land on east, west north, and south (road, plot, etc). It is also records loan history of the bank, if it is clear of all debts or not. If the loan is not clear then it is also recorded.
  4. After that, the advocate takes the sign and stamp of the concerned authority and registers the Title and Search Report. Then advocates issue the final land search report.

Title search reports various requirement              

In the case of buying and selling of the property, the buyer may ask for the deed title and then the seller has to provide the certificate title search to the buyer. It is equally important in other aspects such as bank loans, Rera registration, etc. When someone applies for a bank loan the bank asks for a title search report for 30 years. It is also important to obtain the building permission. For the building permission, the property title report is required for 30 and 50 years. It changes from corporation to corporation. The clean title search helps the buyer to make the further decision.  The search report of the property is equally important in the transfer of ownership land registry.

 

Time Required for the Process of Getting Title Search Report 

 

The time required for getting 7/12 and the transfer of deed means the certificate is 2 to 4 days. And to create a report it takes 2 to 5 days for the advocate. So in total to obtain a Deed of Title is the process of one week.

 

Consultant fees to get title search report

 

It varies from the area of the plot to and location of the plot. It starts from Rs 4000 and can go up to 40,000. As the work is private so cost varies according to the quality of the work. Also, the title search report cost in Pune varies for different service providers.

 

What all services do advocates can offer in land and construction?

 

Advocate deed, gift deed, deed of transfer of ownership, etc Advocates in Pune can help you with services like building stay orders, complaints against stay orders, compliance of any legal document related to land ownership, and having a big role in land deals & construction-related services. Sale deed, transfer deed, conveyance.

 

Title and Search Report Consultant 

 

Foot2Feet is networked with some of the experienced practitioners as well as new talent.

  • We provide assured service.
  • Fast Quotation and Instant Service
  • Hustle free work

If you live in Pune and around Pune then Foot2Feet is best for the Title search report. At Foot2Feet you can get all the information about Title Search Online.